One Critical Habit for Engaging the Unchurched

Posted by David Hill on

One Critical Habit for Engaging the Unchurched

There’s ONE thing at the center of the target for us whenever we’re engaging with unchurched folks.

We’re aiming for a conversation, not a presentation.


When someone speaks up with questions about the Bible or wonders aloud about some of the trickiest topics of faith (Why do bad things happen to good people?), most of us are tempted to reply with the right answer. We coach our staff, volunteers, and small group leaders to respond differently.

Jesus was asked many questions but only answered a few.

Usually, Jesus responded to questions by asking one in return. Did he know the right answer? Yes. But giving it would have ended the interaction. Jesus chose instead to cultivate conversation.

Questions are the cornerstone of the posture we’re aiming for.


For us, the most qualified group leaders aren’t the ones who’ve taken seminary classes or who’ve read all the latest in apologetics; the best leaders are humble and curious. We don’t expect them to know all the answers; we want them to ask good questions.

5 Quick Tips


This less than 2-minute video is full of quick tips we share with our Starting Point* leaders—including the critical difference between asking What questions and asking Why questions. Watch it, then share it with your staff, volunteers, or group leaders.

What’s Starting Point?

*Starting Point is where we point men and women who are new to faith, who are returning to church after being away for a while, or who aren’t yet sure about Jesus. Read more about it (including how to use it at your church) at startingpoint.com.


 

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